APRIL: Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Early Detection Saves Lives

 Oral cancer is nothing to take lightly.  Causing one death every hour, there will be approximately 45,750 new cases diagnosed this year alone.  It also tends to strike men twice as likely as women.

Contributing factors of oral cancer include:

  • Smoking
  • Tobacco use
  • Excessive alcohol consumption (3+ drinks per day)
  • Over exposure to UV light
  • HPV Virus (sexually transmitted)

  7% of diagnosed oral cancer cases that have no identified cause

Smokers are 3 times more likely to develop oral cancer.  Cigars and pipes pose a higher risk than standard cigarettes.

This is how to reduce your risk of oral cancer:

  • Brush & floss regularly
  • Do not use tobacco products
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation
  • Limit sun exposure and always use SPF sunscreen
  • Regular exercise
  • Nutritional supplements ( Vitamin D, Vitamin B, Zinc, Fish oil)
  • Oral cancer screening at your bi-annual dentist exam and cleaning

Cancer Fighting

The way you prepare your meals can play a role as well.  Rather than frying food, give steaming or baking a try!  Bonus: these techniques are also more figure friendly!

Cancer fighting foods:

  • Beans
  • Berries
  • Vegetables
  • Flaxseed
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Green Teas
  • Tomatoes

84% of oral cancer cases can be detected early by your dentist

Dental check-ups are vital to oral cancer detection.  Yes, you should be going in for dentalOral Cancer - spot check-ups twice a year anyways; however, request you get regularly scheduled oral cancer screenings as well!

Oral Cancer Signs to Check at Home:

  • Check the entirety of your mouth
  • All the way inside of your cheeks
  • Underside and top of your tongue
  • Roof of your mouth
  • Lymph nodes

You’re looking for discoloration, lumps, asymmetrical swelling or any other abnormalities that you happen to see.  Even if you aren’t too sure about it, it never hurts to give your dentist a call, ask questions and go have it checked out.

Get involved.  Help raise awareness.  Spread the word.  Get tested!

ADS South, LLC
120 Istoria Drive
St. Augustine, FL 32095
(888) 714-7410

Are you looking to sell your dental practice? Start here…

ADS South Team in Charlotte at National ADS Meeting

When you list your practice with an ADS Specialist, you get not only your local marketing leverage, but also the benefit of ADS’ continual presence in Dental Economics, an exclusive partnership with DentalTown.com to market listings in real time as well as advertising in the ADA News, Dental Entrepreneur Magazine, a relationship with DentistryIQ.com and a connection to every ADS office in America via the ADS website you are currently visiting. The ADS website attracts and reaches potential buyers actively searching for practices.

However, the ADS network reaches far beyond just our member specialist brokers, magazines and websites, into our preferred lenders as well as practice management, accounting and law firms nationwide. These expansive connections allow ADS to reach more buyers in more ways, providing the most exposure possible in the marketing of your practice.

ADS reaches more doctors on a regular basis than any other specialist, nationwide, and, we’re constantly reviewing our marketing, looking for areas in which to expand so to best serve our selling doctors.

Contact ADS South

www.ADSsouth.com | (770) 664-1982
Earl Douglas:Earl@adssouth.com
James Howard:Jim@adssouth.com
Rebecca Kyatt:Rebecca@adssouth.com
Virginia Douglas:Virginia@adssouth.com

Meet the Founding President of ADS South: Nat’l Org of Dental Practice Appraisers & Brokers

At ADS we value our clients and respect their time. That’s why Earl can be anywhere within our service areas in as little as two hours.

Dr. Douglas can present any of the following topics in as little as one hour and up to six hours.  Most topics also include essential information on how to be able to financially be successful in retirement.

1.  Your practice transition

2.  The ten biggest transition mistakes

3.  The fifteen biggest transition mistakes

4.   Increasing your practice value and marketability

5.   Creating and finding value in a dental practice

6.   Dental practice transitions in recession

7.   Evaluating and appraising dental practices

8.   Case studies in successful and not so successful practice transitions

9.   Practice transition principles and strategies

10.  Partnership pitfalls and how to avoid them

11.  Deciding on a practice to purchase

Besides being one of the most experienced transition experts and speakers in his field, Earl M. Douglas, DDS, MBA, BVAL, is the founder of ADS South, a dental practice appraisal and brokering company serving the Southeast.  He is the founding president of ADS, a national organization of dental practice appraisers and brokers.

Dr. Douglas earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, University of Maryland School of Dentistry in 1971. He practiced in the U.S. Army Dental Corps at Fort Benning, Georgia from 1971 to 1974 and in Stuttgart, Germany from 1974 to 1977 and was in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia from 1978 through 1982.

After the sale of his private practice in 1982, he began his career in practice transition consulting. He received his Master in Business Administration degree from Brenau College in 1984 and founded Professional Practice Consultants, Ltd. in the same year.

Dr. Douglas is the author of cash flow analysis software used by professional brokers and lenders. Dr. Douglas is a member and contributor of the Practice Valuation Study Group and a member of The Institute of Business Appraisers and was awarded the BVAL designation (Business Valuator Accredited in Litigation) in 2007.  Dr. Douglas has been admitted as an expert witness before courts in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Dr. Douglas has presented at many dental schools in the Southeast and to various dental study clubs, the Hinman Dental Convention, the Tennessee Dental Association, the National Dental Association, the New Orleans Dental Association, the Rossner Memorial Lecture in New Orleans and a two year series of presentations for Dental Economics.  He has presented for several years to the National Society of Certified Healthcare Business Consultants.

Dr. Douglas is also a contributing author for Dental Economics magazine.

Dr. Douglas can be reached at 770-664-1982 or douglas@adssouth.com

Value or Price – Choose Wisely | Dental Practice Transitions

Earl M. Douglas, DDS, MBA, BVAL.

 

There has been a great deal of discussion over the years about dental practice price, but very little has been said about practice value. It is especially important that practice buyers understand these terms and be able to differentiate between them, since practice value has significantly more impact upon the futures of buyers than does practice price.

Price is the consideration (cash, note, barter, etc.) paid to a seller to acquire an asset. Sellers receive price. Value is the benefit received by the buyer from the use and ownership of the acquired asset. Buyers receive value.

All too frequently buyers zero in on price as the primary practice purchase issue while ignoring the issue of value. However, buyers stand to benefit much more by receiving high value than by paying a low price, since the primary practice value is actually the net income the buyer takes home from the purchased practice.

I illustrate this point by asking buyers to consider two similar practices. Practice A grosses $400,000 and is priced at $275,000. I ask buyers if this is a good deal. Most buyers admit they do not know.

Then we look at Practice B which grosses $400,000, of which the hygienist produces $100,000 and the buyer produces $300,000. After paying all of the overhead expenses and all of the purchase payments, the buyer will have a net income of $140,000. Without even knowing the price, most buyers believe that Practice B is a good opportunity. Knowing the price and gross alone does not make for a well-informed decision. Knowing the cash flow-derived value, or net income, received in return for the amount of work performed by the buyer, does allow for a well-informed decision.

Consider Practice C which grosses $400,000 and is priced at $300,000. After paying all the practice overhead expenses and all of the purchase payments, the buyer will receive value, or net income, of $150,000. Now examine Practice D, which is very similar to Practice C. It also grosses $400,000, but is priced at $250,000. After paying all the practice overhead expenses and purchase payments, the buyer will receive value, or net income, of only $125,000. This comparison shows that it is actually possible to pay a higher price for a practice and still receive more value, or net income. Differences in fixed expenses, such as rental cost, can cause such differences. Which practice would you choose?

While we do not suggest overpaying for any practice, we do point out the old saying, “you get what you pay for”. Since “what you pay for” is net income in the case of dental practices, higher priced practices will generally yield higher net incomes, even after paying the payments. In the case of purchasing a practice, it is often safer to pay slightly too much than too little.

We strongly suggest that if you are considering buying a practice and are seeking professional advice on price, be sure that you also receive a practice cash flow analysis to learn all of the important facts, especially the answers about practice value, the net income you will earn.

Phone: (770) 664-1982 • Fax: (678) 965-1812 • Email: earl@adssouth.com
Originally Published in Dental Economics, November 1998
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